PASSIVE/AGGRESSIVE

By Cid Reyes

 

“When introverts are in conflict with each other… it may require a map in order to follow all the silences, nonverbal cues and passive-aggressive behavior!”

-Adam S. McHugh

 

“He’s passive-aggressive!” Now, there’s a buzz-word so casually bandied about, so easily hurled at someone. But in truth, as with so many behavioral aberrations, we are in the dark. For so clinical a word, we might as well take recourse to the experts:

“Passive-aggressive behavior was first defined clinically by Colonel William Meninger during World War II in the context of man’s reaction to military compliance. Meninger describes soldiers who were not openly defiant but expressed aggressiveness by passive answers, such as pouting, stubbornness, procrastination, inefficiency and passive obstructionism’ due to what Meninger saw as an immaturity and a reaction to routine military stress.” (Wikipedia).

 

Transfer that stress to the workplace, to home, to business transaction and personal relationship, and you have a world mired in negativity.

The paintings in the Passive/Aggressive show are not meant to be taken literally and figuratively. No matter that the images are so virulently distinctive, despite the vehemence of the implied narratives, the artworks are to be read and interpreted as allegories. Thus they are “the expression by means of symbolic fictional figures and actions of truth or generalizations about human existence.” The theme is not an iron–clad stricture of interpretation but rather it functions as a lightning rod of meanings.

Iggy Rodriguez sparks questions of nobility and morality by the very crucial choice of his imagery. His artworks are centered on the swine. Rodriguez, of course, brands his swine as a symbol for a despicable person. In “Monetary Faith,” the artist elevates the swine on a lofty pedestal, a distinct allusion to the Golden Calf idolized by the misguided Israelites. Around it gather a multitude of worshipers, their heads bowed low in adoration. An ironically titled work is “Ode.” To be sure, it is not “a lyric poem usually marked by exaltation of feeling and style.” Rather, the painting depicts a coarseness of nature and behavior. In their crude vulgarity, a pair of swine is seen feasting to their gluttonous hearts’ content. In what seems to be a mockery of the Deposition from the Cross, the lifeless figure of the Christ is hypocritically mourned by a bevy of pigs.

From porcine to equine, the viewer casts a glance at JR Urao’s stallion, titled “Forgiven.” Intriguing is the blood-red gash diagonally slashed across the painting, like a flash of lightning. One wonders what heinous offense the stately stallion might have committed. It is well to remember that the stallion prefigures a human being. A sobering thought to an audience that accepts appearances for truth of character.

Canine, this time, is Melvin Culaba’s “Ang Pintoratso.” Recall that the word dog is slang for “a worthless person,” as in: a fellow called “a lazy dog” or “you lucky dog.” Culaba’s canine is equated to a painter who seems to have transformed into a mad dog, foaming at the mouth, evidently in the grip of rabies destroying the studio. Culaba’s other work, a triptych titled “Kinopya” is a filmic sequence of a woman desolate by the jalousied window.

Is martyrdom the reward for heroism, or its very cause? The painting of Vincent Padilla is the photograph of National Hero Jose Rizal in Bagumbayan, at the exact moment awaiting the volley of fire. The image melds and melts with the passing of time. The work is titled “Life Consecrated to a Great Ideal.”

Perhaps only the hypnotic figure in JR Urao’s “Learning To Unlearn” may be taken as an exact personification of the Passive/Aggressive character. The work is an extreme close-up of staring eyes, which, though shielded by eyeglasses, are still penetratingly discomfiting. The painting is quietly expressive in an unexpected sinister way.

Brendale Tadeo leaves a trail of surrealistic mystery with his three works depicting cycling vehicles. Indeed, they are the artist’s vehicles for transporting the viewer’s vision into destinations unknown. The drivers, engrossed in delivering message or merchandise, are unaware that they are being transformed into nightmarish figures, oozing with the electric energies of dark and evil forces. They constitute a bizarre evolution of innocence into quile and cunning.

The author Bill Maher, who wrote “When You Ride Alone You Ride With Bin Laden: What The Government Should Be Telling Us To Help Fight The War On Terrorism,” is quoted thus: “Not doing anything is doing something and choosing to look away is a passive but no less mortal sin.”

Indeed, passive/aggressive behavior is itself a form of terrorism.

 

"Passive/Aggressive" with artists Melvin Culaba, Joseph De Juras, Vincent Padilla, Iggy Rodriguez, Brendale Tadeo and JR Urao.

Exhibit runs until June 12, 2014

"Passive/Aggressive" with artists Melvin Culaba, Joseph De Juras, Vincent Padilla, Iggy Rodriguez, Brendale Tadeo and JR Urao.

Exhibit runs until June 12, 2014

Start Date: 
Monday, May 26, 2014
End date: 
Thursday, June 12, 2014
Exhibit_Category: 
Exhibits_Review: 

PASSIVE/AGGRESSIVE

By Cid Reyes

 

“When introverts are in conflict with each other… it may require a map in order to follow all the silences, nonverbal cues and passive-aggressive behavior!”

-Adam S. McHugh

 

“He’s passive-aggressive!” Now, there’s a buzz-word so casually bandied about, so easily hurled at someone. But in truth, as with so many behavioral aberrations, we are in the dark. For so clinical a word, we might as well take recourse to the experts:

“Passive-aggressive behavior was first defined clinically by Colonel William Meninger during World War II in the context of man’s reaction to military compliance. Meninger describes soldiers who were not openly defiant but expressed aggressiveness by passive answers, such as pouting, stubbornness, procrastination, inefficiency and passive obstructionism’ due to what Meninger saw as an immaturity and a reaction to routine military stress.” (Wikipedia).

 

Transfer that stress to the workplace, to home, to business transaction and personal relationship, and you have a world mired in negativity.

The paintings in the Passive/Aggressive show are not meant to be taken literally and figuratively. No matter that the images are so virulently distinctive, despite the vehemence of the implied narratives, the artworks are to be read and interpreted as allegories. Thus they are “the expression by means of symbolic fictional figures and actions of truth or generalizations about human existence.” The theme is not an iron–clad stricture of interpretation but rather it functions as a lightning rod of meanings.

Iggy Rodriguez sparks questions of nobility and morality by the very crucial choice of his imagery. His artworks are centered on the swine. Rodriguez, of course, brands his swine as a symbol for a despicable person. In “Monetary Faith,” the artist elevates the swine on a lofty pedestal, a distinct allusion to the Golden Calf idolized by the misguided Israelites. Around it gather a multitude of worshipers, their heads bowed low in adoration. An ironically titled work is “Ode.” To be sure, it is not “a lyric poem usually marked by exaltation of feeling and style.” Rather, the painting depicts a coarseness of nature and behavior. In their crude vulgarity, a pair of swine is seen feasting to their gluttonous hearts’ content. In what seems to be a mockery of the Deposition from the Cross, the lifeless figure of the Christ is hypocritically mourned by a bevy of pigs.

From porcine to equine, the viewer casts a glance at JR Urao’s stallion, titled “Forgiven.” Intriguing is the blood-red gash diagonally slashed across the painting, like a flash of lightning. One wonders what heinous offense the stately stallion might have committed. It is well to remember that the stallion prefigures a human being. A sobering thought to an audience that accepts appearances for truth of character.

Canine, this time, is Melvin Culaba’s “Ang Pintoratso.” Recall that the word dog is slang for “a worthless person,” as in: a fellow called “a lazy dog” or “you lucky dog.” Culaba’s canine is equated to a painter who seems to have transformed into a mad dog, foaming at the mouth, evidently in the grip of rabies destroying the studio. Culaba’s other work, a triptych titled “Kinopya” is a filmic sequence of a woman desolate by the jalousied window.

Is martyrdom the reward for heroism, or its very cause? The painting of Vincent Padilla is the photograph of National Hero Jose Rizal in Bagumbayan, at the exact moment awaiting the volley of fire. The image melds and melts with the passing of time. The work is titled “Life Consecrated to a Great Ideal.”

Perhaps only the hypnotic figure in JR Urao’s “Learning To Unlearn” may be taken as an exact personification of the Passive/Aggressive character. The work is an extreme close-up of staring eyes, which, though shielded by eyeglasses, are still penetratingly discomfiting. The painting is quietly expressive in an unexpected sinister way.

Brendale Tadeo leaves a trail of surrealistic mystery with his three works depicting cycling vehicles. Indeed, they are the artist’s vehicles for transporting the viewer’s vision into destinations unknown. The drivers, engrossed in delivering message or merchandise, are unaware that they are being transformed into nightmarish figures, oozing with the electric energies of dark and evil forces. They constitute a bizarre evolution of innocence into quile and cunning.

The author Bill Maher, who wrote “When You Ride Alone You Ride With Bin Laden: What The Government Should Be Telling Us To Help Fight The War On Terrorism,” is quoted thus: “Not doing anything is doing something and choosing to look away is a passive but no less mortal sin.”

Indeed, passive/aggressive behavior is itself a form of terrorism.

 

"Passive/Aggressive" with artists Melvin Culaba, Joseph De Juras, Vincent Padilla, Iggy Rodriguez, Brendale Tadeo and JR Urao.

Exhibit runs until June 12, 2014

Exibits_Image: